Author: eliasc64

Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia

Since the day I begun traveling, I dreamed that one day I will visit the lower Omo valley. The reason was none other than the amazing series of photos from the Mursi tribe that I saw in a french photography magazine. The lip plates, the body painting, the local customs and beliefs left me in awe. The trip was in my bucket list for decades and finally I decided it was time to do it. It is a hectic year but when I decided I needed a week’s break, the Omo valley came up naturally. I did not have...

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Crocs, Markets and Museums

I went to bed with my noise cancelling earphones so I managed to sleep longer. The noise from the neighboring Orthodox church is defeating and the priest could use some singing classes. After breakfast, we headed to Key Afer, one hour drive, to visit the largest market in the valley. The Thursday market is visited by Banna and Ari, although I spotted a Hammers as well.   Market Day in Key Afer Key Afer is the largest weekly market in the lower Omo valley.   Market Day in Key Afer Banas on market day in Key Afer.   The...

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Mursi and Ari

The night was short. I woke up at 3:30 by the screaming loudspeakers of the neighboring Orthodox church. Apparently the mass in Ethiopia starts at 4am and won’t finish until 7:30. Not a good start for what I was afraid to be a challenging day. I had read a lot about the Mursis and how aggressive they can be, so I was really worried. I was afraid of getting disappointed and destroying one of the visions of my youth. I took up on photography while studying at the university, when I read an issue of the French magazine PHOTO...

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Daasanach and Bana

From Turmi to Omorate is about an hour drive over very good tarmac. A blasé government official in an indifferent office checked our passports and registered the details in a logbook, as this is the last town before the Kenyan border. I wonder if anyone ever checks this data since the blasé official, like so many other blasé officials I have met in developing countries used a special kind of handwriting that makes modern computer-based encryption methods parochial.   We descended the left bank of the Omo river and jumped on a wooden pirogue with our Wegderes and a...

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Karo and the Turmi Market

The breakfast at the Turmi Lodge was minimal. I am sure it had to do with the fact that we were the only guests, but still it was a major disappointment. I settled for some coffee, some juice and what were allegedly french toasts. We drove some 40km west, through Acacia forest and bush that looked like the Serengeti forests. There is a limited amount of wildlife here, except from avians, as the animals were chased away by the human presence. After an hour we arrived in Korcho, a 400 strong village of the Karo tribe overlooking the Omo...

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Konso and Hamer

The breakfast at the Paradise Lodge overlooking lake Chamo was pleasant, but as with every state-run establishment in Ethiopia, we had serious issues in communicating with the staff. Their English is poor and their training, well, poorer. We drove to Konso, a small town that serves as the gateway to the southern Omo valley as well as the capital of the Konso communities.   The Omo Valley A view of the Omo valley near Konso.   Konso Village A Konso village in the Omo Valley. Ping Pong Konso youngsters palying ping pong in one of the villages we crossed....

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Along the Great Rift Valley

Wegderes is difficult to pronounce, but I had to master it. That was the name of our guide and driver for our one week trip to southern Omo Valley, to meet some of the tribes that live in this remote part of Ethiopia called the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Region. We left Addis Ababa on a Saturday morning, driving south to Arba Minch, through the Ethiopian part of the Great Rift Valley. Some 400 km on paved but narrow road, through small towns, agricultural land and some very beautiful landscape. First stop was at Tiya, a 12th century cemetery...

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Zanzibar 2016

The combination of heat and humidity hit us immediately upon exiting the plane on the tarmac of the Zanzibar airport. We spent the next three hours wandering the maze of Stone Town streets. Colors of Stone Town A woman resting in the streets of Stone Town.   Boats Boats in the port of Stone Town, in Zanzibar.   The Clock The clock on the Stone Town palace.   Siblings Brother and sister in Stone Town.   Slavery Memorial the slavery memorial outside the Anglican Christ Church in Stone Town.   The streets are full of life, mostly a relaxed...

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Serengeti 2016

Ole had found a super nice pricing to stay at the Kuba Kuba tented lodge in Seronera, in the heart of central Serengeti. It is a semi-permanent ultra-luxurious lodge, with 80m² tents, hot running water and electricity and even a swimming pool. We stayed for three nights and had two full days of safari. Lioness A lioness in Serengeti.   Eland The Eland (taurotragus oryx) is the largest african antelope and one the shyer.   Lilac Breasted Roller A lLilac Breaster Roller sitting on a tree branch in Serengeti.   Eastern Chanting Goshawk An Eastern Chanting Goshawk in Serengeti.   Buffalo A fuffalo grazing...

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Tanzania 2016

Since I started my business in Africa, there isn’t a single year that I will not return to Serengeti for a safari. My friend Ole, was once more our guide. The occasion was a business trip to Kenya and Uganda with my partner Yiannis and the promise to take him and his wife Deppy to a safari in Africa. We combined a three day safari with three more days in Zanzibar, in order to relax and refuel ahead of a challenging week for business in Kenya and Uganda.   Leopard Leopard Matemwe Matemwe Elephants Elephants Checking Mail Checking Mail A Big...

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One Day Safari in Kenya

After a two-day visit in Nairobi for business, I had a free Saturday before flying to Rwanda and DRC. Peter and Radina offered to visit Lake Nakuru National Park, three hours drive from Nairobi. This presented a great opportunity to test the newest addition to my lens arsenal, the mighty Olympus 300mm f/4. Peter is my colleague and friend who runs our East African operations, with we share the passions for Africa, photography and wildlife. He lives in Nairobi, together with his wife Radina, a Bulgarian native like himself. Peter Peter, my collegue and friend in Nairobi, with his full frame...

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Streets of Congo

An attempt to record contemporary life in Kivu, the eastern province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. While visiting Goma and Bukavu, most of the pictures were shot from a vehicle. DRC is one of the poorest nations in the world, practically a failed state, with mineral reserves that amount to $23 billion.   Life in Goma A family dressed in their Sunday clothes, in the poor neighborhood overlooking the port of Goma. Orange Lady A congolese lady carrying loafs of bread. Women work hard in Cpngo, like in the rest of Africa. Dabord le Bebe Three girls playing on a...

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