Author: eliasc64

The Lofoten Islands

We flew the next day to Bodø, a small town of 50 thousand people, which markets itself as the ‘gateway to Norway’s true north’. The city was still covered with a layer of ice, making walking quite challenging, so we spent about three hours until the ferry’s departure, circling around the central square and the small mall. I do not think there is any exciting activities that we missed while we stayed there. Life seems to be typical of a small town. The only strange thing for a southerner is how much people engage in outdoors activities given the...

Read More

Bergen and Oslo

We flew from Athens to Copenhagen and then to Bergen. The second largest Norwegian city is the hub to the fjord world, surrounded by great landscapes and dominated by the bold color palette of the city’s houses. When we arrived the sun was shining, the skies were blue, there was no wind and despite the fact that the temperature was a bit low for my taste, the conditions were near perfect for an afternoon walk around the port. The buildings are painted in vivid blues, reds and yellows with a fair portion of whites that actually accentuate the color pandemonium....

Read More

Norway

Why is Norway so rich? How is life during the dark and cold winter north of the polar zone? Why are Scandinavian murder novelists so successful? What is so magic about the northern lights? These are some of the many questions I was hoping to answer at the northernmost latitude I had ever been. The place was the Lofoten Islands, a string of small islands in north Norway, connected through bridges with each other and to the mainland. The time was March 2016, close to the spring Equinox, with sufficient daylight to explore the Norwegian winter scape.   Bøosen...

Read More

Inle Lake in B&W

I recently re-worked on the pictures I shot in Myanmar during the 2015 trip, processing them in black and white and rediscovered some of the places I visited. Inle Lake was definitely on this list. The black and white imagery conveys better what I sensed during these three days on the waters of Inle. Here is a short 5 min slide show with the Ten Years After playing in the background. Inle...

Read More

Ecuador

I visited Ecuador for the first time in 1992, by accident. My intention was to spend one week under the sun of Venezuela. When I was ready to board the American Airlines Miami-Quito flight, I discovered that I had no visa stamped on my passport. Since AA failed to check it at boarding time in Austin, they were kind enough to offer to fly me to an alternative destination! I chose Ecuador and did not regret it. I wandered in Quito, met local people and visited the Amazonian forest, where for the first time ever, I experienced true solitude. That was...

Read More

Quito And Otavalo

We arrived in Quito on Friday evening, after a long flight form Madrid. Mariscal Sucre, the new international airport is about one hour drive form the old town. We lodged in the beautiful Hotel Patio Andaluz, now declared a National Treasure, close to Plaza Grande. Patio Andaluz Patio Andaluz, our hotel in Quito.   The next morning, we drove to Otavalo, two hours north, to visit the the local markets. On the way we stopped by the sun clock right on the equatorial line. There isn’t much to see, but mysteriously, I got excited standing with my legs spreading...

Read More

Andean Highlands

Still overwhelmed by the rainforest and the Huaoranis, we started early in the morning from Quito to go south. We rented a car and a driver without any guide. Our planned itinerary included the Quilotoa loop, Baños, Riobamba, Guamote, Alausí and finally Cuenca.  Then we would take the plane back to Quito and spend one more day in Otavalo, before returning back to Athens. The Quilotoa loop is defined by a road that circles the Quilotoa crater. It takes about three hours from Quito on the Panamericana to reach Pujili, the point where we diverted and started ascending the Quilotoa...

Read More

Myanmar slideshow

Burma – officially known as Myanmar, nowadays – is a large country. Covering a strange shape of 676 thousand square kilometers, with a long strip protruding in the south, a diversified population of 52 million, very few English speakers, a large number of regions blocked by the military government for national security purposes and one of the poorest transportation infrastructure, it is definitely a challenge for the casual tourist and the seasoned traveler alike. Yet it is undoubtedly one of the most interesting countries in the world to travel today. This is a photo documentary of my 2015 trip in...

Read More

The Insatiable Traveler

Susan Portnoy’s blog is my favorite travel blog to date. I guess I am being subjective, since her travels and interests touch my sweet spot: Africa, Myanmar, Cuba, wildlife safaris, coupled with beautiful pictures and great writing. The Insatiable Traveler is beautifully designed with the right mix of storytelling, photography and tips. If you like traveling and photography, you cannot afford to miss it. Stop by and join forty eight thousand followers that can’t be wrong. Way to go Susan! featured photo by Susan...

Read More

2015, A Year In Travel

I travel every week of the year, mostly for business but I go to great extends to make time for private traveling. 2015 has been a busy year that brought me among other places to Myanmar, Ecuador, Tanzania, Spain, Turkey, Hungary, Kenya, Ethiopia, Germany, USA and of course in Greece and Bulgaria.   Myanmar The year started with a wonderful trip to Myanmar. We visited the old city of Bagan and flew over the hundreds of temples, Mandalay with the rich Bhuddist tradition, the lively city of Yangon. We did some great trekking in Kalaw, spent a couple of days...

Read More

Africa by Sebastião Salgado

Recently, my good friend and frequent travel companion, Vassilis, offered me Africa by Sebastião Salgado. I keep it on my coffee table and has become my retreat for thinking, dreaming and inspiration. The powerful black and white images open a new window to the Africa and the developing world. I recommend it strongly to all free travelers and photographers and free thinkers. IMHO Salgado is the greatest of all living photographers, a true master of black and white imagery, a powerful narrator of beauty and suffering. The Salt of the Earth (2015) is an excellent documentary film by Wim Wenders, about the life and work...

Read More

The Huaorani

We returned to Quito and met with Nana and Vassilis who had arrived from Athens the day before. Our hotel for the night was on La Ronda, the nightlife strip of Quito, but surprisingly the sound isolation was perfect and I slept like a stone. The next morning we got on a mini van together with Andres, our guide for the next four days, two Swiss ladies – mother and daughter – and John, a retiree from England. The five hour drive to Baños was uneventful. After a short stop in Baños and a visit to the local market...

Read More

Pin It on Pinterest

error: